Wednesday, September 24, 2014

DIY Art Cart from PVC Pipe

Have you ever had issues with transporting your art from one show to another.  After years of wrapping my art in blankets and bubble wrap or foam and then laying them in the back of my Chevy HHR to only find that they are getting chipped on the edges or arriving with broken glass frames.

I started looking for a cart to transport my art and I looked at laundry carts, Rubbermaid carts or even other types of carts, all of which did not fit into my car.  I finally decided to build my own custom sized art transport carts that would fit both my art and car space with the seats folded down. I decided on a size that was 18" by 42" to allow two units in the back and with a size that my largest art (30" by 24" could fit.  It would need casters to roll into the galleries.
 
This is what the cart looks like after cutting, gluing and assembly.



Looking at some of the detail of the assembly.
I had Home Depot cut the plywood to my size (18" by 42") which they do for free (up to two cuts free).

Below you can see the Three way connector at the top of the unit.


3 way connector

 You can remove the printing on the pipe by using Acetone (danger of vapors) or sanding (much elbow grease) or you can paint over them with white spray paint.  Or you can leave them, after all its your cart for your purposes.

4 way connector

 And finally, you can see the detail of the table caps attaching to the plywood and the casters on the bottom for mobility.  All in all it is a very easy build requiring cutting of the pipe to your sizes, gluing the pipes together and screwing in the table caps and the casters.  I also placed screws in all the end pipe connectors to strengthen the "handles" that would be supporting the entire weight of the cart and the art when moving it in and out of the car or truck.  The glue might have held but I wanted to make sure it did not deconstruct in the middle of an art show.
Table Cap from the top
Table Cap and Caster attaching to plywood

  I purchased all my parts from Home Depot but I could have gone to Lowes too.  Three of the parts had to be ordered online because Home Depot did not stock them in local stores.  I ordered online and had them deliver to the local store with free shipping.  I used 3/4" PVC pipe in order to keep the weight down.  It ended up weighing 15 lbs.

One small note on the parts list.  While I wanted to use 3/4" PVC pipe the "Formufit Table Screw Cap" only came in 1' as its smallest size.  So I had to purchase a 1" to 3/4" adapter (converter) to down size the table cap to fit the 3/4" PVC. 


Art Cart ready for art

Parts List and cost of parts

PVC Art Cart Costs




Quant  Each   Total  Note
18" x 42" 1/2" Plywood 1       14.93        14.93 Cut at Home Depot from 2' x 4' sheet
10' 3/4" PVC 3         2.56          7.68 Home Depot
Formufit 3/4 in. Furniture Grade PVC 4-Way Tee in White 4         2.30          9.20 Ordered online from Home Depot
Formufit 3/4 in. Furniture Grade PVC 3-Way Elbow in White 4         2.04          8.16 Ordered online from Home Depot
Formufit 1 in. Furniture Grade PVC Table Screw Cap in White 4         2.53        10.12 Ordered online from Home Depot
1" to 3/4" PVC Adapter 4         0.89          3.56 Home Depot
Christy's 8oz PVC Pipe Cement 1         5.97          5.97 Home Depot





Total Cost of each cart

 $    59.62















































































































Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Thursday, September 18, 2014

A Survey of Photography and Fine Art

You are invited to a unique 90 minute program about the intersection of photography and fine art by pro photographer Randy Jackson called “A Survey of Photography and Fine Art” will be held on October 8, 2014 from 6-7:30 PM at the West Valley Arts Council’s ARTS HQ in Surprise.  The survey of major topics of photography as fine art include: Getting the Shot, Equipment, Post Processing and Advanced Art Techniques.  Jackson will provide real world examples of his art; how it was created, how it was processed and the meaning and future of the field.  Please RSVP to (623) 935-6384 and drop me an email that you are coming to randyjacksonimages@cox.net.



Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Monday, August 4, 2014

Shooting Clouds

It's that time of year where Arizona is in Monsoon Season. That means that the weather is changing each day with the increased dew points bringing in afternoon and evening thundershowers (or massive dust storms called "Haboobs"). Unlike the rest of the country these weather patterns are usually short lived and result in amazing cloud formations. Sometimes the clouds are dark and foreboding, but mostly they just generate beautiful billowing cumulus clouds with blue sky beyond. Now, why are clouds so important to a photographer? Many times in the Southwest photographers are faced with beautiful scenic panoramas that are surrounded with clear, blue sky that is, frankly boring.
Storm Clouds Backlit by the Sun

As a fine art photographer I like to have my images reflect the most pleasing of compositions and that means that a boring or overcast sky would need to to replaced to make the best looking large fine art image.  Many afternoons during Monsoon season I will drive five minutes down the road from my home to capture a library of cloud photos that can be used to impart a certain look in a photograph being created at other locations. 

Arizona Sunrise


Other times might require a sunrise or sunset mood over a scene.   I sometimes shoot real estate shots for local realtors and these often require sky replacement to enhance the image.

A side by side comparison of one of my photographs with sky replacement.  What a difference it makes.

Avalon Bay with Clouds
Avalon Bay Overcast


More examples of cloud pictues that I have taken this month.




I currently have about 700 cloud images in a folder that I can use in a variety of circumstances to enhance an image.  The beauty of Arizona is that many locations that I shoot come with their very own beautiful cloud formations in the shot as I originally capture it.



Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Small LED, off camera, battery and AC, bright, cheap

The holy grail of off camera lighting is to have a small unit, bright, inexpensive and works with either battery or AC power. Until recently the major component of AC power was driving up the cost of LED lights. Quite recently I discovered several components available on Amazon that could make for a great off camera LED light. For several years I have used a battery powered light from Amazon, the Newer 160CN. I paid less than $40 for several of the units, but they only worked on batteries (6-AA) and they had to be changed about every 3 hours during a shoot.

Very recently I found that Amazon has started selling an add-on power supply for CN-160 light.  This power supply has an AC to DC Switching Power converter that attaches to a dummy battery component that converts regular AC power to 7.5 v 2 amp DC power to power the LED lights. The light is rated at 5600K, 660 Luminous flux (according to the manufacturer).  It is pretty bright and when aggregated together is good for just about any studio purpose. 
It is very light weight and does not require you to modify the light and you can still use the batteries if you are on location.  This part costs less than $16.

This makes a complete AC powered LED light for around $56.

I also picked up another part: a Triple Hot Shoe Adapter that will allow me to aggregate two or three of the LED light into one adapter to place in a soft box or umbrella setup to increase the overall light and soften it at the same time.  The triple adapter is less than $16 on Amazon. 

Triple Holder with 3 LED lights (lights not included)


The best I have seen for an AC powered LED light is around $600-$900 for some of the more well known brands.

This unit would be ideal for a small head shot production facility and provides continuous lighting with very good color rendition. 

UPDATE (September 19, 2014) I just bought a
NEEWER CN-216 216PCS LED Dimmable Ultra High Power Panel on Amazon and this power adapter also works on CN-216 (the CN-216 provides about a 1/3 brighter light than the CN-160.





Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Friday, July 11, 2014

My love/hate relationship with the Epson R3000 Printer

An many of you know I have posted several articles about the Epson R3000 printer.  I have been very impressed with the quality of the prints and they have been great for fine art prints in art shows that I have been featured here in Arizona. 

However, I have now given up on the printer after only 2 1/2 years of usage.  I have detailed the ongoing issues with maintenance of the printer in previous blogs and was able to overcome most of the problems.  But finally, the head clogging (ink clogging the heads) made it so that I could not get a reliable print from the printer.  I sent the printer off to an Epson Authorized repair facility in California (I could not find an authorized dealer in Arizona) and received a quote back that was for more than the cost of a new printer.  The main issue was in the print head itself.  On the Epson R3000 unit the print head is NOT a consumer replaceable unit-it must be replaced by an authorized dealer and the cost for the dealer for the print head alone was around $400.  Add the labor and that placed the repair quote for more than $700. 

After getting the quote I started to research my options and I could have just bought another R3000 printer, but I thought why should I reward Epson for designing a printer that I could use for less than three years. 

So, I looked at the Canon Pixma line of printers.  Their reviews said they were on the par with the Epson products.  But, a big difference was the print head on the Canon Pixma printers is a consumer replaceable unit with a cost of under $100.  The Canon Pixma Pro line is similar to the Epson R3000 and 3880 line of printers with the Epson 3880 being a wider format printer.  The Pro 1 is a 12 ink printer, the Pro 10 is a 10 ink printer and the Pro 100 is an 8 ink color printer.  The Pro 1 and Pro 10 printers were a little over my price range (list price of $999 and $699 receptively).  I chose the Pro 100 printer at a list price of $499, but B&H Photo had a $300 mail in rebate for the printer at the time I purchased it.  That made the price to me about $199! You can see the specs on the printer at:
http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/printers-all-in-ones/professional-inkjet-printers/pixma-pro-100

I received the printer about a month ago and have been totally impressed.  The quality of the prints is on par with the Epson inks and it seems that the ink usage is a little better than the Epson.  The printer is quite heavy (43.2 lbs) and is built like a tank.

The specifications include:
Printer TypeWireless Professional Inkjet Printer
FeaturesAirPrint
Auto Photo Fix II
Borderless Printing
Optimum Image Generating System

Photo Printing
Grayscale Photo Printing
Wireless Printing
Print Speed (up to)8" x 10" Image on A4 with Border:
Approx. 51 seconds seconds6
11" x 14" Image on A3+ with Border:
Approx. 1 minute 30 seconds6
Number of Nozzles6,144
Print Resolution (Up to)Color: Up to 4800 x 2400 dpi4
Black Up to 4800 x 2400 dpi4
OS CompatibilityWindows® 7, Windows 7 SP1, Windows Vista SP1, Vista SP2, Windows XP SP3 32-bit
Intel processor
Mac OS® X v10.5.8 - 10.9.x7
Standard InterfacesWireless LAN (IEEE 802.11 b/g/n)
Ethernet
Hi-Speed USB
PictBridge (Cable not included)
Ink CompatibilityCLI-42
Ink Droplet SizePicoliter Size 3pl
Ink Capacity8
Paper Sizes4" x 6", 5" x 7", 8" x 10", Letter, Legal, 11" x 17", 13" x 19"
Paper CompatibilityPlain: (Plain Paper, Canon High Resolution Paper
Super High Gloss: Photo Paper Pro Platinum
Glossy: Photo Paper Plus Glossy II, Photo Paper Glossy
Semi-Gloss: Photo Paper Plus Semi-Gloss, Photo Paper Pro Luster
Matte: Matte Photo Paper

Fine Art Paper: Fine Art "Musem Etching"; Other Fine Art Papers
CD/DVD: Printable CD/DVD/Blu-ray Disc
For additional compatible papers, click here
Maximum Paper Size13" x 19"
Output Tray CapacityAuto Sheet Feeder: 150 Sheets of Plain Paper
20 sheets Photo Paper (4"x6"); 10 sheets (Letter/8"x10"); 1 sheet (A3+)
Manual Feeder: 1 sheet of Photo Paper (all sizes)
Noise Level ApproxApprox. 38.5 dB(A)
Physical Dimensions27.2" (W) x 15.2" (D) x 8.5" (H)
Weight43.2 lbs.
Power Consumption19 W (2.3 W Standby)
Warranty1-Year limited warranty with InstantExchange Program. 1-Year toll-free technical phone support.14
Software IncludedSetup Software & User's Guide CD-ROM
PIXMA PRO-100 Printer Driver
My Image Garden12: Full HD Movie Print, CREATIVE PARK PREMIUM13, Fun Filter Effects and Image Correction/Enhance are accessed through My Image Garden
Print Studio Pro
Quick Menu
  I titled this post as my love/hate relationship with the Epson R3000 printer and I have to honestly say that it was a very good printer for the way I used it for 2 1/2 years.  If I would have expected to only get that amount of time with the printer I probably would not have purchased it or I would have purchased the larger 3880 version and got a few more years use.  Of course, the 3880 has the same issues as the R3000 regarding the print head, but the 3880 does have a user replaceable waste ink reservoir that is not present in the R3000.  That may have increased the lifetime of unit.  But I did not know any of these issues when I purchased the printer. 

This post is certainly only my opinion of the printer and I want to state that other users my have a different experience than I had.  Perhaps the marketplace for ink jet printers is such that one should expect to replace the unit with a new one every two years and maybe that is acceptable to some buyers.  I have an expectation that is grounded around a HP LaserJet that I expected to run for 5 years or more.  I don't want to start a fight on the internet about this issue. My opinion is only one person and it may or may not be representative of other photographers.   I just want to urge all of you to research your purchases carefully and buy according to those opinions that are from your experience or from those that you trust. 
Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure