Saturday, February 7, 2015

A New Backup Plan

Along with the new year I discovered that my main disk storage for my photography was exhibiting some flaky behaviors.  I have utilized a Drobo (Generation two, USB 2.0 version) for my primary storage of my raw and processed images.
 By strange behavior I mean that it was forcing itself into a disk rebuild as if a drive had failed.  The rebuild was successful without replacing the drive, but it caused me think that I should upgrade my data storage solution sooner rather than later.

A Massive Amount of Images


Now I have a lot of images from a decade of digital photography.  I have over 121,000 images.  I organize by images into several folders based on my usage of images.  I use Adobe Lightroom for my primary photo editing platform.  After capturing an image I use Lightroom to bring it into my computer in an "Original" folder organized by date.  I load all images in the DNG format.  After bringing in the RAW files I select the images I am going to process further with Lightroom tools and then I use Lightroom's editing tools or I use Photoshop or other software to further process the images into my production photographs or art products that I print for exhibitions.

My original storage solution was a Drobo 4 bay unit with a USB 2.0 interface.  It was configured with two 1.5 Terabyte Western Digital Green Drives and two 2 TB green drives.  With a total storage capacity of 7 TB of storage Drobo's proprietary "BeyondRAID" architecture provided 4.53 TB of usable storage.  An explanation of BeyondRAID can be found on Drobo.com:

"Drobo’s BeyondRAID technology solves the fundamental issues that traditional RAID can’t. Built on the foundation of traditional RAID, BeyondRAID adds a layer of virtualization that chooses the correct protection algorithm based on data availability needs at any given moment. Since the technology works at the block level, it can write blocks of data that alternate between RAID protection levels.
If you need to add storage capacity to a Drobo, simply insert additional disk drives or replace the smallest disks with larger ones – no need to change RAID levels, purchase a new storage array, or go through the complex administration of pooling RAID groups."

A more detailed technical explanation can be found Drobo's e-book " Drobo Technical Innovation" that I have made available on my Dropbox site at Drobo e-book on Dropbox.

My Old Backup Plan

To back up that amount of data I was making a full backup of all my critical folders utilizing Acronis True Image 2014.  The backup files were stored on an Internal 2 Tb disk on my computer.  As my photo collection grew I started experiencing more and more issues with storage space.  I knew I would have to buy more disk.  The other problem with this scheme is that I had only one backup set.  If it was corrupted I didn't have any backup.


Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

A New Year

My last post was about lifetime learning and my unofficial New Years resolutions (even though this is almost February 2015) are centered around doing more shooting or at least adding to my photography portfolio each and every month. I also am going to be learning more about my artistic mission by repeating some of my courses on Kelby One, Lynda.com and Photoshop Artistry. I have talked about those before and they have more training than I could ever cover but certainly courses that would strengthen my skill levels. Another project I am doing is to join a group called Awake. This is Sebastien Michael's new year long endeavor to move 1,000 people from around the world into a new level of artistic creativity. This course will not necessarily be about the techniques of art and photography, but more about the reasons that successful artists succeed.

While it is still a little fuzzy to me I believe in Sebastien and know that he has the skills to portray a new way of thinking about our craft. A few words about Photoshop Artistry, the course I have been studying for the last two years. In this course I learned to work through dozens of pro-level techniques while compositing my own creations — achieving a profound expertise and absolute familiarity with the tools and methods that enable me to pursue my artistic vision without constraint. The courses covered everything from masking to blend modes to selective blurring. 

The art piece on the right shows some of those techniques where I composed two of my photographs: a butterfly from the Phoenix Botanical Gardens and a stylized part of a sculpture of reaching hands that I captured at a resort on the grounds in Sedona.  I added some textures, some words and some vector graphics and blended them into a pleasing presentation. 

The second piece of art that I created, based on Photoshop Artistry was a portrait of a dear friend from Santa Barbara that I captured one Christmas morning and proceeded to transform this beautiful young woman into a sophisticated  vision in a Europeon style background. 

These are but two of the new art projects that I created in 2014, but are indicative of many more that are to come. 

You can also join up to the Photoshop Artistry course at the link above.  Let me know and I will see if any discounts are available.




Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Lifetime Learning


One of the precepts of my success in business and photography has been my attitude of "lifetime learning". Those of you that know me have observed that my life in the technology world was characterized first by knowledge and certifications about each technology that I was associated with. Most of that learning was through non-traditional means such as books, seminars and short training sessions. I had achieved much success by the time I was in my 50's. By the late 1990's I had noticed that my lack of a college degree was hampering my further rise as a technology manager. I embarked on a rather frenzied mission to get my Bachelor's degree from the University of Phoenix. I got my degree of Bachelor of Science in Information Technology in 2001. As a mediocre student in high school (back in the 1960's) I was quite surprised at how well I embraced the university environment and classes. I graduated with honors  as the top student in the IT division. I then went on and tackled my Master of Arts Degree in Public Administration in 2004 at Webster University, once again graduating with Honors and a 4.0 GPA. From that time until after I retired in 2011 I went back to learning from newly expanding internet based methodologies that would be considered more non-traditional. I continue on that path each and every day. My post-retirement career would be in the field of photography (my non-job passion for the previous 20 years). I did not choose to get a formal degree in photography (mainly because of the cost). I do think that I have carved out a good path to learn, explore, perfect and future proof my knowledge base. I continue to learn from several different Internet web technologies and am always exploring more ways to learn each week.


The first of those learning sites is Kelby One (kelbyone.com). Kelby One is an offshoot of Scott Kelby's Photoshop User magazine and a part of the National Association of Photoshop Professionals. I signed up for Kelby Training (its earlier name) when it started and was able to maintain my discounted membership from those early days. At first there were very few courses and the production values were fairly low. As time progressed and Photoshop User enterprises continued to succeed they increased the course catalog, instructors and quality into what it is today.

Kelby One has over 10,000 courses ranging in length from 20 minutes to over 4 hours. Most courses are around an hour in length.   They cover categories of Photoshop, photography, video, Lightroom, design, business and inspiration. Every week more courses are published and the course content is expanded to cover the leading edge of technology in all those categories. Kelby One is tied closely to the Adobe product line, but not exclusively and have been expanding their course offerings. You can learn more about Kelby One at: http://kelbyone.com/

Current pricing information and benefits are included in the screen shot on the right.


My next major learning portal is Lynda.com.  They are similar to Kelby One, but cover more technology disciplines including Information Technology, business software, marketing, development and audio and music.  Lynda's courses tend to be longer with many in the 3-5 hour range.  Some of the instructors are the same as those on Kelby One.

 The pricing is fairly high, but nothing like having to pay for a 4 hour seminar and you get access to the entire course catalog.  The highest price option includes project files that are used in the instructions.  I don't pay for the project files (choosing the 2nd tier product) and it does not seem to matter a whole lot.

You can browse the site at: http://www.lynda.com/member.aspx

 The production value of the videos is very high and I have been able to learn many technologies on the site.








The two web sites above are the major players in the technology learning marketplace (but not necessarily the only ones).  I also subscribe to a couple of smaller but more specialized web sites.


Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

DIY Art Cart from PVC Pipe

Have you ever had issues with transporting your art from one show to another.  After years of wrapping my art in blankets and bubble wrap or foam and then laying them in the back of my Chevy HHR to only find that they are getting chipped on the edges or arriving with broken glass frames.

I started looking for a cart to transport my art and I looked at laundry carts, Rubbermaid carts or even other types of carts, all of which did not fit into my car.  I finally decided to build my own custom sized art transport carts that would fit both my art and car space with the seats folded down. I decided on a size that was 18" by 42" to allow two units in the back and with a size that my largest art (30" by 24" could fit.  It would need casters to roll into the galleries.
 
This is what the cart looks like after cutting, gluing and assembly.



Looking at some of the detail of the assembly.
I had Home Depot cut the plywood to my size (18" by 42") which they do for free (up to two cuts free).

Below you can see the Three way connector at the top of the unit.


3 way connector

 You can remove the printing on the pipe by using Acetone (danger of vapors) or sanding (much elbow grease) or you can paint over them with white spray paint.  Or you can leave them, after all its your cart for your purposes.

4 way connector

 And finally, you can see the detail of the table caps attaching to the plywood and the casters on the bottom for mobility.  All in all it is a very easy build requiring cutting of the pipe to your sizes, gluing the pipes together and screwing in the table caps and the casters.  I also placed screws in all the end pipe connectors to strengthen the "handles" that would be supporting the entire weight of the cart and the art when moving it in and out of the car or truck.  The glue might have held but I wanted to make sure it did not deconstruct in the middle of an art show.
Table Cap from the top
Table Cap and Caster attaching to plywood

  I purchased all my parts from Home Depot but I could have gone to Lowes too.  Three of the parts had to be ordered online because Home Depot did not stock them in local stores.  I ordered online and had them deliver to the local store with free shipping.  I used 3/4" PVC pipe in order to keep the weight down.  It ended up weighing 15 lbs.

One small note on the parts list.  While I wanted to use 3/4" PVC pipe the "Formufit Table Screw Cap" only came in 1' as its smallest size.  So I had to purchase a 1" to 3/4" adapter (converter) to down size the table cap to fit the 3/4" PVC. 


Art Cart ready for art

Parts List and cost of parts

PVC Art Cart Costs




Quant  Each   Total  Note
18" x 42" 1/2" Plywood 1       14.93        14.93 Cut at Home Depot from 2' x 4' sheet
10' 3/4" PVC 3         2.56          7.68 Home Depot
Formufit 3/4 in. Furniture Grade PVC 4-Way Tee in White 4         2.30          9.20 Ordered online from Home Depot
Formufit 3/4 in. Furniture Grade PVC 3-Way Elbow in White 4         2.04          8.16 Ordered online from Home Depot
Formufit 1 in. Furniture Grade PVC Table Screw Cap in White 4         2.53        10.12 Ordered online from Home Depot
1" to 3/4" PVC Adapter 4         0.89          3.56 Home Depot
Christy's 8oz PVC Pipe Cement 1         5.97          5.97 Home Depot





Total Cost of each cart

 $    59.62















































































































Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Thursday, September 18, 2014

A Survey of Photography and Fine Art

You are invited to a unique 90 minute program about the intersection of photography and fine art by pro photographer Randy Jackson called “A Survey of Photography and Fine Art” will be held on October 8, 2014 from 6-7:30 PM at the West Valley Arts Council’s ARTS HQ in Surprise.  The survey of major topics of photography as fine art include: Getting the Shot, Equipment, Post Processing and Advanced Art Techniques.  Jackson will provide real world examples of his art; how it was created, how it was processed and the meaning and future of the field.  Please RSVP to (623) 935-6384 and drop me an email that you are coming to randyjacksonimages@cox.net.



Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure