Friday, December 9, 2016

Closing down Blog

Effective the end of December 2016 I am closing down this blog. 

I want to thank all of those that have read this blog over the years.  I have enjoyed writing about photography and artistry as I have learned my craft.  I hope each one of you has learned something new from my blog at the same time I was learning from other photographers. 

I have found that this blog is slightly redundant from my other web sites and no longer warrants updating.  

I will still have my main gallery of photography at randyjacksonimages.com and I will still display a subset of my portfolio on Fine Art America


Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Friday, November 4, 2016

Beautiful Alaska - The Inside Passage

In August of this year my wife and I had the opportunity to travel to Alaska on a Princess Cruise.  The fifteen days we spent off the Alaska coast and traveling in the interior of Alaska provided a look into a most beautiful and rugged part of the American experience. The Inside Passage is referred to as the route along the Alaskan coast that leads from the Vancouver area along the coastal towns and ending the port of Whittier, Alaska. 

Sunset at Sea
While most of our travels were along with many other tourists from around the world we did get to see and photograph a unique slice of wilderness that is rarely seen by those of us confined to the lower 48 states.

Our first evening at sea out of Vancouver, B.C. brought us down to earth and into vacation mode with a fantastic sunset over the Canadian shoreline looking toward Alaska.  After our first night of cruising we approached the small town of Ketchikan, our first step onto Alaskan land.

This was a most beautiful site as we sailed into port before dawn and witnessed the pink glow of the rising sun over the hills.  Ketchikan is a tourist town during season but is best known as the "Salmon Capital of the World".
Ketchikan at dawn

From Ketchikan we went on an excursion called "Lighthouses, Totems and Eagles" and that is what we experienced.
Guard Island Lighthouse
 I was surprised to learn that their are lighthouses all along the shore of Alaska.   Makes sense when you think about it with a need to protect ships from rocks and shoals.

Magnificent Eagle

We did see some totem poles on the excursion, but the highlight was the great Bald Eagles that were pervasive in the area.  We were traveling in a small boat with local guides that were familiar with the area.

The Bald Eagle is America's National bird and is truly a huge magnificent creature.  They are so regal looking out over their domain.  I wanted to also include below the original un-cropped photo that was made at some distance with my 400mm zoom lens.  This view shows what a photographer has to look for in making an image.

Un-cropped eagle image
This image was captured on a Canon 6D full frame camera that makes it possible recognize an amazing amount of detail and resolution in an original capture.  You can see when I enlarge the picture I was able to retain the detail in the feathers of the eagle and in the bark of the dead tree limb.

Our next port of call was Juneau, the capital of Alaska.  Juneau is a de-facto island city with no mainland roads into the community.

The hauntingly beautiful Mendenhal Glacier is 12 miles from downtown Juneau.  A short bus trip took us to Tongass National Forest and the huge, 13.6 mile long Mendenhal Glacier that has a negative glacier mass balance meaning that it will continue to retreat in the foreseeable future.
Mendenhal Glacier

 The glacier is very popular with tourists and features a large visitors center that has historical exhibits and ranger presentations for all to understand the history and ecology of the glacier.









Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Friday, July 8, 2016

People I've Met - George Wallace

This is a photography blog, but photography is a story about vision that comes about as a result of how a photographer sees a subject.  I have lived an interesting life over the last 40 years. During this lifetime I met or saw several famous people.  These interactions added to my life experiences that brought me to a stage of life that added to my vision or at least to how I reacted to the vision.

This series of articles is about my short interactions with these people.  Just because I have met these people doesn't mean that I was famous or involved in organizations at a high level.  I was just a worker bee in several causes that brought me into the circle that exposed me to the famous.

George Wallace was a symbol of everything I hated about politics.  The segregationist  Governor of Alabama he was famous for standing in the door of the University of Alabama to prevent black students from enrolling.

In 1972 he was a candidate for President of the United States when he was paralyzed in an assassination attempt on May 15, 1972.  I was an alternate delegate to the Democratic National Convention in Miami Beach that year and Wallace spoke from the convention floor on July 11th.

George Wallace (Public Domain Photo)
I had observed speeches from Teddy Kennedy and Shirley Chisholm that year but the speech from this horribly wounded man was just as charismatic as any I have ever heard.  While I did not support his populist views (I was a a McGovern delegate), I still applaud the spirit of a man that has principals to pursue his ideals to the point of potentially giving his life for them. 

I can remember the buzz on the floor of the convention when we heard that Wallace would be speaking.  The Utah delegation (my state at that time) was seated in the front row of the convention and security was the highest that I had ever seen.  All of our bags and briefcases were searched and their were hundreds of uniformed and undercover security personnel surrounding the podium.  It took quite a while to get Wallace to the stage and then up to the podium so that he could speak.  Keep in mind this was just two months after the assasination attempt. 

Never the less, the audience was very respectful and we all listened to every minute of his speech.  This was truly one of those lifetime events that I would remember forever. 
Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Friday, July 1, 2016

People I've met - Cesar Chavez

This is a photography blog, but photography is a story about vision that comes about as a result of how a photographer sees a subject.  I have lived an interesting life over the last 40 years. During this lifetime I met or saw several famous people.  These interactions added to my life experiences that brought me to a stage of life that added to my vision or at least to how I reacted to the vision.

This series of articles is about my short interactions with these people.  Just because I have met these people doesn't mean that I was famous or involved in organizations at a high level.  I was just a worker bee in several causes that brought me into the circle that exposed me to the famous.
Public Domain Photo

Cesar Chavez has always been one of those men that I most admired.   In 1962 Chavez formed what would be the United Farm Workers Union.His aggressive but non-violent tactics made the American farm workers struggle a moral cause with national support.  By the 1970's his tactics had forced growers to recognize the UFW as the bargaining agent for 50,000 field workers in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Florida.

In 1973-74 I was working as a community organizer in my home town of Artesia, N.M. with a group of municipal workers that were on strike.  A delegation of 5-7 people from our organization (affiliated with the United Steelworkers Union) were invited to a small church on the west side of Albuquerque to meet with him. 

After mass at the church our group met with Chavez to tell him about our efforts in Southern New Mexico.  We met for about an hour and I can remember everything about this remarkable man.  He was very short and was very soft spoken.  When we shook hands I can remember that I was shocked that his hands were very soft (I was expecting the hands of a farm laborer). 

Public Domain Photo
When he spoke I was taken with the charisma that he exuded. He asked pointed questions about our tactics and our results and we discussed what we wanted to accomplish.  He was very attentive and I left the meeting with a renewed faith in what we were doing and our moral imperative to keep going.  

Cesar Chavez died much too young in 1993. While my interaction with this great man was short it left me with a lasting impression of what men with good hearts can do if they put their minds to a cause.  For thirty years Cesar Chavez dedicated himself to the problems of some of the poorest workers in America. The movement he inspired succeeded in improving working conditions and worker safety throughout the Southwest and Florida. 
Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure

Saturday, June 18, 2016

People I've Met - Jimmy Carter

This is a photography blog, but photography is a story about vision that comes about as a result of how a photographer sees a subject.  I have lived an interesting life over the last 40 years. During my lifetime I met or saw several famous people.  These interactions added to my life experiences that brought me to a stage of life that added to my vision or at least to how I reacted to the vision.

This series of articles is about my short interactions with these famous people.  Just because I have met these people doesn't mean that I was famous or involved in organizations at a high level.  I was just a worker bee in several causes that brought me into the circle that exposed me to the famous.

In 1978 I was working as a lobbyist for the Communications Workers of America (CWA).  Each year the CWA would have a political convention in Washington, D.C. where the delegate would meet with their state representatives to espouse the political agenda of the CWA. 

Jimmy Carter (James Earl Carter, 39th President of the United States) had been elected in 1976 with the help of labor unions.  On April 5, 1978 many of the delegates were invited to a reception in the White House to meet the president and hear a major policy speech.  This was not a small intimate group, there were from 300-600 people invited. 

I had been on a tour of the White House where we were shown down the corridors of the main floor with a line of tourists behind velvet ropes and heaven forbid if you needed to sit down on one of those Duncan Phyfe chairs. 

Being invited to a reception is a totally different experience.  It is like being invited to someones very nice house.  The velvet ropes were down and we were allowed in many of the rooms on the State Floor of the White House.  Many of rooms were set up with wine and cheese trays.

 I was thrilled with the special cheese ring that was included on the trays and got the recipe later ( Rosalynn Carter Cheese Ring). I was in the White House from about 1 PM to 5 PM. 

At one time Amy Carter came home from school and went up the grand staircase to the living quarters.  Spread throughout the rooms and at certain doors were very large formally dressed Marine guards that were tasked to keep the quests from wandering through another area of the house.  One impression I had was that those famous rooms in the White House (Blue Room, Red Room, Green Room) were small just like in a real and regular house.  I did sit in those Duncan Phyfe chairs and in fact did drink a little wine as a sat (maybe a little more than a little). 

Around 4 PM the President came into the East Room of the White House and delivered a major policy speech (I don't remember the subject at this time, just like a regular house guest). What an honor to be able to be in the home of President of the United States. 

While I did not get too close to the President I was impressed about how confident he acted and how gracious he was about invited me and my group into his house. 

As I mentioned at the top of this post I have met some famous people in my life but these interactions were small and should not imply that I was buddy's with the famous. 



Disclosure: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally or believe they will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” See my detailed disclosure at: My Disclosure